Tag Archives: France

Reincarnation or Atavism in the Iron Field? By Ioav Cabantchik

DID YOU KNOW?

The medieval practice of bloodletting was based on the Moslem medical writers who emphasized revulsion (bleeding from a site located as far from the ailment as possible). This position was attacked in 1514 by Pierre Brissot (1478-1522), a Paris physician, who stressed the importance of bleeding near the locus of the disease (derivative bleeding). He was declared a medical heretic by the Paris Faculty of Medicine and derivative bleeding was forbidden by an act of the French parliament. In 1518, Brissot was exiled to Spain and Portugal. In 1539, the celebrated anatomist, Andreas Vesalius, continued the controversy with his famous Venesection Letter, which came to the support of Brissot“. 

From T.A. Appel and A.B. Davis  “Bloodletting Instruments in the National Museum of History and Technology” 1–103, 1979  https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810258.41.1

That venesection runs in the veins of our Pierre Brissot (former President of Bioiron and leading authority in hemochromatosis) may not come as a surprise to our members, but is the profession an hereditary trait or is that an atavistic feature of PR?….

In fact, Pierre Brissot is not only aware of his distinguished ancestry profession but also shared that information publically in his recently published historical article in the Revue du Praticien ( Vol. 67 _ Décembre 2017 ) titled “LA SAIGNÉE EN MÉDECINE : une très longue histoire qui n’est pas encore terminée”  (“Bleeding in medicine: a very long story that is not over yet”).

http://www.larevuedupraticien.fr/histoire-de-la-medecine/la-saignee-en-medecine-une-tres-longue-histoire-qui-nest-pas-encore-terminee

Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Iron Biology – IRSD Toulouse, France

A postdoctoral research fellow position is available for 3 years in the Delphine Meynard research group (http://en.irsd.fr/team-4-genetics-and-regulation-of-iron-metabolism.html).  We are part of the Digestive Health Research Institute (IRSD) in Toulouse in France. Toulouse is a dynamic research area located in south of France that comprises many internationally recognized laboratories and gives access to a network of high-level skills research platforms in life sciences (fundamental biology, agronomy, environment, health) making possible almost all research projects.

The Digestive Health Research Institute accredited by INSERM, INRA, ENVT and Toulouse University, is internationally recognized and offerins a productive scientific environment centered on basic and clinical research to understand and treat diseases of the intestine and the liver. IRSD brings together a total of >80 researchers, professors, technicians, students and post-docs of different nationalities.

Our research focuses on iron metabolism and its disturbance in human diseases. Our lab is a dynamic team of scientists, MD, graduate students, and technicians. Our main goal is to characterize the regulation of iron homeostasis at the cellular and molecular levels and to develop new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of iron related disorders. The postdoctoral project will specifically address the role of proteases in the regulation of iron homeostasis and develop new strategies to target those proteases. The postdoctoral fellow will use several approaches including molecular and cellular biology, animal models, and biochemistry but also techniques related to proteases such as enzymatic activity assay, activity based probes, and in situ zymography.

Applicants for this position must have a Ph.D. in the biochemical sciences. A suitable candidate will have a proven track record of research accomplishments including first author publications in international peer-reviewed journals and excellent experience in: molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, mouse models. Skills with proteases would be appreciable. In addition, excellent communication/interpersonal skills are required.

Please email a cover letter, CV, and two letters of support from former mentors or collaborators (including their contact information) to Delphine Meynard: delphine.meynard@inserm.fr